Tag Archives: Paul McCartney

McCartney Rocks Austin for the first time…

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I have had the privilege to see Paul McCartney 3 times. So when my friend Jim, who lives in Austin, called to invite me to see Paul in Austin, I almost declined the offer. Boy am I glad I didn’t. I witnessed history. Witnessing history is guaranteed when you go to a McCartney show. First of all, IT’S PAUL MCCARTNEY ON STAGE! Last time I checked he is a living legend. Second, he seems to always dust off a song or two that were never played live by the Beatles. Third: As many times as Paul McCartney has played in Texas, it was hard to believe when he announced from the stage at the Frank Erwin Center, that he had never played in Austin before. Paul was rewarded with a very enthusiastic crowd that was ready to rock, and Sir Paul and his powerful band delivered!

The ticket said it was an 8:00 pm start time and there was no opening band. We arrived around 7:40. A DJ started playing club mixes of Beatles songs at 8:00. At 8:30 the DJ left the stage and a pre-recorded soundtrack played while video screens displayed photos covering the entire life of Paul up to this moment. Paul and his band mates walked on stage proptly at 9:00 and launched into “8 Days a Week”.

The show alternated between Beatles songs and Wings songs. A real highlight of the first half of the show was a powerful version of the Wings song “Let Me Roll It“, followed up by a rocked up version of the Beatles song “Paperback Writer“.

An amazing thing happened during the opening of “Maybe I’m Amazed“: Paul forgot the opening cord sequence of the Piano intro. He handled it in fine form with his typical laid back demeanor on stage. He simply quipped “Well, at least you know we’re live…” The crowd ate it up. He simply restarted the song and went on.

In the middle of the show the band left McCartney on stage alone. He walked to a smaller stage that then elevated him way above the floor of the arena. He performed “Black Bird” which he described as song of social protest that was designed to give hope to Black Americans that were being discriminated against during the 60’s. He then performed a song he wrote for John Lennon called “Here Today“. He described the song as a conversation between he and John that never happened but should have. It was a very emotional moment.

In the next section Paul made history when he played two songs that had never been played live in Texas. He performed “Lovely Rita Meter Maid” and “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite” from “Sargent Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band” It was awesome. The video screens showed old psychedelic videos from the 60’s that the Beatles had made for “Yellow Submarine” and “Magical Mystery Tour“. Very cool…

After “Mr. Kite“, Paul paid tribute to George Harrison. He started playing “Something” on a Ukulele. Slowly the band joined in one by one, leading up to the big guitar solo in the bridge of the song. It was a very emotional and very fitting tribute to George.

This led to the closing sequence of songs that included “Let It Be” and “Hey Jude“. I was trying to take a close up photo of Paul singing the line “The movement you need is on your shoulder…” during “Hey Jude“. I was zoomed in on McCartney’s face. He forgot the lyrics leading up to that line… I saw him “blah, blah,” the words and then recover. Putting this with the “Maybe I’m Amazed” piano gaffe, I wonder if age is finally catching up to Paul McCartney?

Paul came back twice for encores and closed the show with an awesome sequence of songs: “Yesterday”, “Helter Skelter” and the final songs of “Abbey Road” (Golden Slumbers, Carry that Weight, The End.)  2 and 1/2 hours of great music. The show ended at 11:30 and Paul had to come back and play the next night as well!

It is interesting that this tour is hitting smaller cities and not the usual big venues. Erwin Center only seats 12,000 for a show. So it may take some effort on your part to catch him this time around. But consider this: This might be the last time. Don’t miss this chance to see him live. He and his band mates will ROCK YOU! Paul will not disappoint. And when you are standing with everyone else singing “Hey Jude” at the top of your lungs, you will know that there is so much more that unites us all than divides us. “And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make…”

Set list:

Eight Days a Week

Junior’s Farm

All My Loving

Listen to What the Man Said

Let Me Roll It

Paperback Writer

My Valentine

Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Five

The Long and Winding Road

Maybe I’m Amazed

I’ve Just Seen a Face

We Can Work It Out

Another Day

And I Love Her

Blackbird

Here Today

Your Mother Should Know

Lady Madonna

All Together Now

Lovely Rita

Mrs. Vandebilt

Eleanor Rigby

Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!

Something

Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da

Band on the Run

Back in the U.S.S.R.

Let It Be

Live and Let Die

Hey Jude

First Encore:

Day Tripper

Hi, Hi, Hi

Get Back

Second Encore:

Yesterday

Helter Skelter

Golden Slumbers

Carry That Weight

The End

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Posted in Life Events, Live Performance Reviews, Rock Music | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

George Harrison Documentary is must see Television…

George Harrison

Martin Scorsese has struck again.  First he made the documentary “The Last Waltz”:  a film about the final concert of The Band.  Then he makes a documentary about the early career of Bob Dylan called “No Direction Home”.  Now he gives us this amazing documentary called:  “George Harrison – Living in the Material World”.

The documentary aired last week on HBO.   The documentary is in two parts and is a total of about 4 hours long.  Scorsese was given exclusive access to George Harrison’s private archives by his widow Olivia Harrison.  Much of the material has never been seen before.  

Part one starts with his childhood and ends with the making of “The White Album”.  Some of the highlights of part one were the discussion with Paul McCartney about how George auditioned for John Lennon in the dead of night on the top deck of a Liverpool double-decker bus.  There are a lot of very interesting storys, pictures, and video about their early years in Germany provided by their long time friend Klaus Voorman.  The best moment of part 1 is right at the end when they interview Eric Clapton about playing on the song “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”.  Eric tells how George insisted that he play on the cut.  Eric says that the song is about the slow disintegration of the Beatles from George’s perspective: “I look at you all, see the love there that’s sleeping; while my guitar gently weeps.”  That was a wow moment for me.  I  had never heard that before.  Now it seems so obvious.

Part 2 covers the break up of the Beatles and continues the story of George’s exploration of eastern religious thought.  Highlights include interviews with Phil Spector, Ringo Starr and his last wife Olivia Harrison, as well as his son Dhani.  There is a riveting conversation with Olivia about the night a nut broke into the Harrison home and attacked and stabbed George.  Also, her description of  the moment of his death.

This documentary is well worth the time invested to watch it.  You can catch the reruns on HBO or it is available on demand at HBO GO.com.

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Posted in Life Events, TV Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

What can I say about…”Something/Anything”!


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This LP was one that I bought in the great garage sale heist.  What can I say about “Something/Anything”?  A Tour De Force? A masterpiece of sound and vision?  What can be said about the massive talent of Todd Rundgren?  When he made this album in 1972 he became known as the new “wunderkind” of Rock and Roll.  He wrote every song, he played every instrument on sides 1-3, he sang every vocal part on side 1-3, and he produced the Record as well.  There are very few musicians in the world who can pull that off and do it so well.  Paul McCartney did it on his first solo album after he left The Beatles.  Stevie Wonder did when he recorded the masterpiece “Intervisions”.  Trent Reznor pulled this off on his debut CD Nine Inch Nails “Pretty Hate Machine.”   (I think that Reznor was heavily influenced by Rundgren even down to his appearance in his early years.)  I’m sure there are more examples.  If you can think of some,  I’d like to hear from you.  It seems that you could count the musicians that have this capability on one hand.  Maybe two hands…

Todd Rundgren is a musical, and technological Renascence Man.  The number of multimedia firsts he has pulled off in his life are stunning.   In 1978 he performed the first interactive Television concert.  In 1979 he opened his own Video Studio.  In 1980 he invented the first color graphics tablet and licensed it to Apple who released it as the Utopia Graphics Tablet.  In 1981 his video “Time Heals” was the first video to combine live action and computer generated graphics at the same time.  This video was one of the very first videos ever played on MTV and Todd produced, directed, and created the video.  1982 he performed the first live cablecast of a Rock Concert.  In 1992 he released the first interactive CD called “New World Order”.  In 1995 he launched the first interactive world concert tour.  In 1998 he launched Patronet, the first direct artist subscription service.  It goes on and on…

His long musical career really got going when he formed the now famous 1960’s “cult band” Nazz.  After three albums he left and formed a band call Runt. He made two records under the band name of Runt.  They had a well known hit that most people know as just a Todd Rundgren song.  “We Gotta Get You A Woman”.  It made the billboard charts.  Then came Something/Anything and it catapulted him into the the pantheon of legend.

He is also one of the greatest producers of Rock and Roll.  The list is unbelievable.  XTC –Skylarking, Grand Funk Railroad – Were An American Band, also albums for Patti Smith, Hall and Oates, The Psychedelic Furs, Cheap Trick, and the 5 best selling record of all time “Bat Out Of Hell” by Meatloaf.  This is the tip of the iceberg because there are at least 40 albums that Todd has produced.

So we are in the presence of genius.

The lyric sheet has some great personal notes from Todd that I will share as I go through the songs.  So let’s begin:

 

Side One:

Todd sub-titled this side as follows: “A bouquet of ear-catching melodies.”  I think you will agree.

I Saw The Light

This was one of Todd’s biggest hits.  It sounds like a hit the second the song starts.  Here is what Todd has to say about this great song:  “If there’s a single on this  album, this is it, so I put it first, like at Motown.  Dedicated to Paul Fishkin, the man with the 45 rpm ears (but still no woman).” Paul Fishkin is a well known record producer.   It is proof of Todd Rundgren’s musical instincts that he knew before the record was released that this would be a hit!  It takes me back to being a kid and listening to AM radio.  A great example of what Todd became credit with inventing: Power Pop.  Here’s the song…

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It Wouldn’t Have Made Any Difference

Todd writes, “The meaning of this song is open to interpretation.  Most people think it means “It wouldn’t have made any difference to me if you loved me or not.” I always thought it meant “If you really did, then why did you act like such a shmuck?”

I think that says it all.  Here’s the tune…

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Wolfman Jack

Todd writes:  “I have a dream that I am cruising along Mulholland Drive late at night and the wolfman plays this record over the air, screaming his jive and singing along at the bottom of his lungs.  “Hey baby, you’re on a subliminal trip to nowhere.  You better get your trip together before you step in here with us! (Tony Sales, 1971)
Tony Sales was one of the members of Todd Rundgren’s band Runt.  This is one of many songs about Wolfman Jack, the famous DJ. I also like The Guess Who’s “Cry For The Wolfman”.  Here’s the song…

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Cold Morning Light

Todd writes:  “I really don’t know what this song is about.  It was sort of an accident.”  The creative process is usually a mystery to the creators.  Many musicians have trouble verbalizing where their ideas come from.  Todd Rundgren himself has been quoted many times saying things like “the songs just write themselves…”  Here’s the song…

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It Takes Two To Tango (This Is For The Girls)

Todd writes:  “This one could just as easily be for the boys.  Change the words if you like.” We always hurt the ones we love the most.  It definitely cuts both ways.  Here’s the song…

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Sweeter Memories

Todd writes:  “No, this is not a drug song.  Yes, I stole the drum part from Levon.”  The drum reference is to the great Levon Helm, the drummer of The Band.  Todd produced their album Stage Fright.  It sounds like Levon Helm to me too.  Here’s the song…

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Side 2

Todd sub-titles side 2 as follows…”This is the cerebral side.  In fact the last song is so cerebral it’s almost embarrassing.

Breathless

Todd writes:  “Realized at Runt Recorders, 2501 Astral Drive.  If you want time, don’t bother the guy who lives there now.  The studio moved and he doesn’t know anything about it.”  2501 Astral was Todd house up off of Mulholland Drive in L.A.  You can see “Runt Records” in the photo gallery. The center fold of this 2 LP set has an awesome photo of Todd recording Something/Anything.  You can see a piano, a synthesizer, and an 8 track reel to reel recorder among  the other rubble that had accumulated in the room.  The game Todd talks about at the beginning of this track is real.  You can hear every example as you listen closely to the rest of the record.  See how many you can spot.  Here’s the track and get your headphones ready…

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The Night The Carousel Burnt Down

Todd writes:  “My first movie score.  Unfortunately, there is no movie to go with it.”  Here’s the song…

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Saving Grace

Todd writes:  “The There song of a generation, yea. of all Mankind.  My publisher will be overjoyed.”  It is a universal thought and feeling we have all had at one time or another.  Here’s the song…

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Marlene

Todd simply states:  “A Shiver and a sigh.”  Again, Todd has pretty much said it all.  Here’s the song…

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Song Of The Viking

Todd writes:  “Written in the feverish grip of the dreaded “d’oyle carte”, a chronic disease dating back to my youth.  Dedicated to Miss Patti Lee Smith.”  The D’oyle reference is about the famous producer of Gilbert and Sullivan, the great operetta composers of 19th century England.  Todd has had a life long love affair with Gilbert and Sullivan Operetta’s.  Patti Lee Smith is the famous Patti Smith that was part of the punk rock movement and is a rock and roll hall of fame inductee.  Todd produced one of her albums.  I guess they both dig Gilbert and Sullivan.  Here comes a bit of silliness.  Have fun with it.  It won’t hurt you at all…

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I Went To The Mirror

Todd writes:  “This song is sort of an experiment in mixed media.  As far as AM programming goes, it’s a piece of crap.  The idea is to lay with your head between the speakers and look into a hand mirror while the song is playing.  Headphones will do if you can’t take it lying down.  Let me know if it works.”  This is the song Todd referenced at the beginning of side 2 as the most cerebral cut on the record.  I dare you to try the lying on the floor with a mirror thing.  Here’s the song…

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Side 3

Todd sub-titles side 3 as follows:  “The kid gets heavy.”

Black Maria

Todd writes:  “I wish I knew what this song is about.  I could swear I’ve heard it before.”  This highlights another interesting point about the creative arts.  Sometimes art has no meaning.  I hear people at concerts or art galleries experience art and then ask “what do you think it means?”  Sometimes it means nothing at all…  This is classic Todd Rundgren power pop.  Here is one of the best songs on the album…

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One More Day (No Word)

Todd writes:  “Another track from Runt Recorders.  It’s a song about people with all the time in the world.  What a drag.”  I think I know what he means.  A very sad song.  Here it is…

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Couldn’t I Just Tell You

Todd writes:  “The hits just keep on coming.”  This song was a hit song on the radio.  I had forgotten all about it till I heard it again.  It was like catching up with an old friend.  I really enjoyed hearing it again.  Once again, how did Todd know it would be a hit?  Again his instincts were dead on.  Here’s the song…

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Torch Song

Todd writes:  “The original version was recorded at Runt Recorders (see inside cover) but the sudden appearance of a motorbike in the second verse and the sound of a radio station playing a Dixieland rendition of ‘Hello Dolly’ in the repeat chorus caused it to be junked.”  That is too bad.  There’s something cool about making a major hit record while standing on your coffee table in your living room.  Here’s the song…

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Little Red Lights

Todd adds cryptically:  “A song about the joys and hazards of driving.  Also a “you know what” to “you know who.”  The instrumental section in the middle of the song is given the following description from Todd Rundgren:  “Instrumental in 3 movements:  1st, 2nd, and 3rd gears.”  I think you get the meaning.  Here’s the song…

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As a reminder, on these first three sides of the LP every note, every voice, everything you hear was performed, written, and produced by Todd Rundgren.  On side four he invites other musicians and friends in to the studio to help out.  The list is very long.

Side 4

Todd writes: “Baby Needs A New Pair Of Snakeskin Boots” A Pop Operetta.  My original idea for this side was a series of songs with sing along choruses.  All the songs were performed live and there were no over-dubs.  The people that showed up were the people who snag and played, meaning that anyone who happened to be in the studio or in the neighborhood and didn’t have anything better to do came in to play.  Everybody, including me, learned the songs immediately prior to recording them, so most of it is spontaneous to a degree.  Anyway, I decided it would scan better if I drafted  it into a sort of operetta , that kind of thing being very popular nowadays.”  This is really stunning in light of the success of one of the songs on this side of the record.  Hello , It’s Me… was Todd Rundgren’s biggest hit.  He’s telling us it was rehearsed with musicians that just showed up and they all learned the song and immediately cut it live with out any corrections.  Essentially what you are hearing on this side of the record is a live recording of a studio session.  Amazing!

Overture – My Roots

Todd writes:  “Money – Performed by a group of the same name, circa 1966.  Rick Valente – lead vocal.  Randy Read – rhythm guitar and owner of the equipment.  Collie Read – bass and Randy’s brother. Some guy named Stockman plays the strange rhythms.  That’s me on guitar.

Messin’ with the Kidd – performed by a group known as Woody’s Trcuk Sstop at the Artists Hut in Philidelphia, late ’66.  The personnel changed so many times that I don’t remember who played except for the demonic guitar work.

Scene 1 – The back room at Max’s Kansas City.  All around are barely familiar faces, each with the same look of despair.  At the back corner table under a hideous red fluorescent light sculpture sits our hero.  a salad is set before him and he begins to sing and sob into it:

I have combined the Overture with Dust In The Wind.  Here it goes…

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Piss Aaron

Todd writes:  “As the stains of the song die away everyone leaves our hero alone to despair his miserable life of struggling for stardom.  Enter o covey of N.Y.C. rock critics. They are despairing the low ebb in popular opinion toward rock critics.  Every night they meet to tell stories about high school (what else?).  Our Hero (In disgust):  ‘It doesn’t have to be perfect as long as it’s…you know…stupid enough, it’s cool.’  Richard Meltzer (played by Amos garret) “ah, my meat!’

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Hello It’s Me

Todd writes:  “Scene 2 – The next day.  Our Hero is doing a demo for a record company of dubious competence.  When he arrives at the studio, he becomes taken with one of the background singers, so much so that he has trouble counting the song in.  It is a tune from his past.”

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Some Folks Is Even Whiter Than Others

Todd writes:  “He gets a little nervous on the second middle-8, but regains his cookies and chalks up an above average performance..  The kid waxes funky for the fadeout.  There are many people now in the studio, dancing and gyrating in a hypnotic manner.  But when the song is over, he finds that the girl is gone.  Again he is alone, meandering around the giant studio complex (which has been operating at a loss for several months.)  He passes an open door where a bunch of ‘hepcats’ (studio musicians) are doing a date.  He is recognized.  Serge: ‘There goes Todd’ O.H. ‘Yipes!’  They decide to ‘jam’.  The kid waxes jive and breaks into a message song a la New Tempts (not to demean anyone’s sincere intentions, including mine).

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You Left Me Sore

Todd writes:  “Scene 3 – Three weeks later.  Our hero is back in the studio, this time under contract (one week with 900 three day options).  The company’s new president is a young hot shot hoping to up the corporate image.  At the urging of the AMA, he has convinced the kid to write a public service kind of message song t hip people to the dangers of V.D.  The kid has had other things on his mind, hoverer, particularly the cute little background singer.  She is there today to sing, and he is there to sing to her.  She confesses a love for him.  O.H.:  ‘Love is infectious…’  The Big Singer:  ‘I’m falling in love with the singer.’  The Producer:  ‘The was the take!’

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Slut

Todd Writes:  “Scene 4 – The Whiskey a Go Go L.A.  Our hero is slumped in a chair in the corner of the dressing room, half conscious.  Mario, the manager, splashes a Coke in his face to revive him.  O.H.:  ‘The sugar in that water was enough to revitalize me and that Coke syrup there that was in that glass and the saccharine…Mario (snapping him out of it.):  ‘Todd, there’s that nation of fans you can’t let down.’  O.H.:  ‘Oh, I’m sorry fans.  I balked for a moment, but I’ll play all night if you want me to.’  He babbles meaninglessly as he is led to the stage.  He breaks into a song of everyday degeneracy in the pop world.”

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Todd concludes the Operetta: “Our hero has sung his heart out.  His throat is ripped to shreds.  As the last chords die, the merciless silence bears witness to the fact that everyone in the audience has split.  Our hero sighs and drops dead on the spot.

O.H.: ‘Whew’

The End”

So what has happened to Todd Rundgren?  I assure you he is still alive and kickin’!  Check out his MySpace page and his web site:  www.tr-i.com.  He just released a new CD of music of Robert Johnson called“Todd Rundgren’s Johnson” if you can believe that!  I look forward to seeing what trail he blazes next. I also will look forward to seeing him perform in Dallas again some day soon.  I saw him in Chicago as one of the members of The New Cars.  He did some of his old songs including “Hello It’s Me…”  If I were you, I’d make sure I was there next time he comes to your town to perform.  Don’t miss a chance to see this great Rock and Roll living legend.  Life is short.  Play hard…

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Posted in Vinyl | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments